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Is there any serious side effects of using Gynaecosid?

Is there any serious side effects of using Gynaecosid?

What is a Gynaecosid Tablet?

The active ingredient in gynaecosid pills is a combination of methyloestrenolone and methyl estradiol. Together, they help to lessen the activity of estradiol-17-beta steroid.

Gynaecosid’s main ingredients are either progestins, androgens, or anabolic steroids, which are all classes of drugs.

Gynaecosid Tablet use

Periods are brought on by gynecosid in females or girls who are not pregnant. There are many causes of irregular periods, including oestrogen insufficiency. Such inadequacies are treated by this tablet, which also aids in menopause abnormalities. The symptoms of post-menopausal vaginal atrophy can also be lessened with the aid of these pills.

Gynaecosids are used to promote blood clotting and to activate particular nuclear receptors. These tablets also treat additional factors that contribute to irregular periods.

These pills are prescribed by doctors to treat primary and secondary amenorrhea as well as urine urgency. Those who experience painful urinating and UTI symptoms may also use this medication. Gynaecosid tablets can be used to treat pelvic pain, unpleasant urine odours, and other conditions.

How to use?

You need a glass of water to take this tablet but avoid chewing it. Take this tablet as your doctor prescribed for you. You should not take overdose. If you have missed one dose, take it as soon as possible. But avoid taking one dose with another as it may cause some serious side effects.

Side Effects of Gynaecosids

Gynaecosid side effects may not be experienced by everyone, although some individuals may do so. These possible negative effects are rare, but they could be very bad when they do.

Girls and women who experience any of the following side effects after taking Gynaecosid pills should see a doctor.

  • Drowsiness
  • Virulent discharge
  • Put on weight
  • bleeding after withdrawal
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • stomach pains
  • elevated blood pressure (Severe Symptoms)
  • increased sexual inclination
  • increased development of hair
  • Skin problems
  • voice variations
  • Breast sensitivity (Severe Symptoms)
  • chest pain
  • swollen legs (Severe Symptoms)

Risks and Warnings

If a woman or a girl has one of the following conditions, she should not take gynaecosid tablets:

  • Pregnancy
  • unexpected genital bleeding
  • Blood clots 
  • Oversensitivity

Those who are sensitive to this drug’s components, such as methyloestrenolone and methyl, may be allergic to them. There’s a chance you’ll develop skin rashes, redness, itching, etc. In the event that you get an adverse response, be careful to avoid consuming it.

Interactions

The effects of Gynaecosid Tablet may worsen if you take other medications at the same time, or it may stop working altogether. You may be at an increased risk for adverse effects as a result. Your doctor will prescribe medication appropriately if you let him or her know about all of the prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking. The following may interact with gynaecosid tablet:

  • Bromocriptine: The drug bromocriptine is a member of the dopamine receptor subclass.
  • Corticotropin: The hormone corticotropin controls the release of corticosteroid hormones by acting on the top portion of the adrenal gland.
  • Cyclosporine: The drug cyclosporine is used to stop organ rejection following transplantation.
  • Dantrolene: It is used to treat muscle spasms or spasticity.
  • Isoniazid: It is used to treat infections caused by tuberculosis.

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Is Norethisterone good to treat gynecological disorders?

Is Norethisterone good to treat gynecological disorders?

Gynecological Disorders

A woman’s reproductive organs undergo continuous change from puberty to menopause due to sexual activity, pregnancy, age, natural processes, etc. Gynecology is the branch of medicine that deals with the condition female reproductive systems (vagina, uterus, and ovaries).

A gynaecological disorder is a condition that affects the female reproductive organs. It including the breasts, the uterus, the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the vagina, and the vulva. Almost every woman will experience a gynaecological problem at some point in her life. It may be disastrous or insignificant.

Types of Gynecological Disorders

There are many different tpes of Gynecological Disorders found in wome. Some of the most common types of disorder include,

  • PCOS(Polycystic ovary syndrome) – The most frequent reason for anovulatory infertility is PCOS. Women who have PCOS are more likely to develop a number od medical conditions. It includes endometrial cancer, endometrial hyperplasia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and mood problems.
  • Endometriosis – About 10% of women of reproductive age are affected by endometriosis, which significantly contributes to the formation of pelvic adhesions, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and persistent pelvic pain.
  • Uterine Fibroids (leiomyomata) -The most frequent benign gynecologic tumour in women, uterine fibroids (leiomyomata) are linked to a number of harmful health outcomes, such as irregular uterine bleeding, pelvic pain, infertility, miscarriage, and preterm childbirth.
  • Vaginitis – Any condition that results in swelling or inflammation of the vulva and the vagina is referred to as vaginitis. Yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis, non-infectious vaginitis, and vaginitis that is transmitted through sexual contact are common types of vaginitis.
  • Menstrual Disorders – Irregular or heavy menstrual bleeding affects quality of life and can be a sign of underlying gynecologic diseases including endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, or anovulatory disorders.

Norethisterone

Norethisterone is a medical drug available to us under the name Noriday which belongs to a class of medication called Progestins. This medicine is used for several women reproduction related disorders such as painful periods, premenstrual tension, breast cancer, endometriosis and also for the treatment of gynecological disorders.

How to use?

Norethisterone is available to us in a form of pill that must be taken by mouth with or without food as per your doctor’s prescription. It is usually taken once a day daily. The dosage and length of the treatment is based on your medical condition, response to the treatment and other medicine that you may be taking for the same or different reason. Swallow the tablet whole rather than chewing or crushing it in your mouth as it may release all the drug in your mouth which increases the risk of side effects.

Your doctor may start you with a low dose which will increase gradually. Take the medicine at the same time daily to get the most benefits from it. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed as this may also increase the risk of side effects without any improvement in your condition. Discuss all the other medicines that you might be taking along with  Norethisterone for the same or different reasons. Follow the medical prescription carefully and inform your doctor in case of any exception or confusion.

Side Effects of Norethisterone

Common side effects observed while medicating with Ibandronate are nausea, vomiting, headache, weight gain, bloating or breast tenderness, may occur. Inform your doctor if these conditions persist or get worse.

There are some serious side effects which must be informed to the doctor right away if observed such as lumps in the breast, mental/mood changes, severe stomach/abdominal pain, unusual changes in vaginal bleeding, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin, etc. 

There are also some severe allergic reactions involved with these medications which require immediate medical attention if observed such as rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), trouble breathing, severe dizziness, chest/jaw/left arm pain, confusion, sudden dizziness/fainting, pain/swelling/warmth in the groin/calf, trouble speaking, sudden shortness of breath/rapid breathing, unusual headache, unusual sweating, weakness on one side of the body, vision problems/changes, etc.

Precaution before using Norethisterone

  • If you have any allergies, including those to other progestins or norethindrone, let your doctor or pharmacist know before using this drug. Inactive chemicals in this product have the potential to trigger allergic reactions or other issues. To learn more, speak with your pharmacist.
  • Inform your doctor or pharmacist of your medical history before taking this medication, especially of any of the following conditions such as blood clots (for example, in the legs, eyes, or lungs), blood clotting disorders (such as protein C or protein S deficiency), high blood pressure, abnormal breast exam, cancer (especially endometrial or breast cancer), low levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL), depression, diabetes, severe headaches/migraines, heart problems (such as heart valve disease, irregular heartbeat, Jaundice, liver disease (including tumours), unexplained vaginal bleeding, history of yellowing of the eyes or skin (jaundice) during pregnancy or while using hormonal birth control (such as pills or a patch).
  • Inform your surgeon or dentist of all the products you use prior to surgery (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).
  • Your face and skin may develop blotchy, dark spots as a result of this drug (melasma). This effect could get worse in the sun. Keep sun exposure to a minimum. Avoid using sunlamps and tanning booths. When outdoors, wear protective gear and sunscreen.
  • Pregnancy should not be the time to use this drug. Inform your doctor as soon as possible if you become pregnant or suspect that you may be pregnant.
  • Small doses of this medicine may enter breast milk and cause unfavourable effects on a nursing newborn. Before breastfeeding, speak with your doctor.

Norethisterone effects on Gynecological Disorders

  • With regard to treating dysmenorrhea, causing amenorrhea for at least six months, and reducing the size of ovarian endometriomas, the current data showed that NET was effective.
  • Progestins have anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effect in endometriotic tissues and do not raise the risk of thrombosis. In endometriosis, NET and DNG both seem to be equally effective at reducing pain and the size of lesions. DNG is anti-androgenic, but NET also exhibits this property. These two progestins lack the strong glucocorticoid or anti-mineralcorticoid effects that many other hormonal medications have. Even progestins by themselves may help in bone development. Because NET is partially converted to estrogens, this may be an advantage over DNG.

In conclusion, the available evidence points to NET as a viable treatment for endometriosis-related dysmenorrhea and for shrinking ovarian endometriomas. Oral progestins alone can be used at any age, have very few adverse effects, do not increase the risk of thrombosis, and are capable of suppressing ovulation and causing amenorrhea.

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Does ovulating & menstruating women need more Progesterone?

Does ovulating & menstruating women need more Progesterone?

Progesterone

The menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and embryogenesis of humans and other species are all influenced by the endogenous steroid and progestogen hormone known as Progesterone. It is a member of the class of steroid hormones known as progestogens and is the primary progestogen in the body.

Estrogen is typically a component of hormone replacement treatment, which is used to alleviate menopause symptoms and lower the chance of contracting certain diseases. Estrogen can, however, also lead to an unnatural thickening of the uterine lining and raise the risk of uterine cancer.

The danger of getting uterine cancer is reduced and this thickening is prevented by progesterone. In women of reproductive age who have previously ceased menstruating after experiencing regular periods, progesterone is also used to induce menstruation (period).

There is no reliable scientific evidence to support the use of progesterone supplements or other over-the-counter medications for infertility, menopausal symptoms, or any other condition.

Progesterone levels in over-the-counter medications may differ from those listed on the label. FDA approval is not necessary for these goods. With a healthcare professional, go over the use of prescription progesterone products. Don’t mistake progesterone for pregnenolone or wild yam, either. They are not equivalent.

How to consume Progesterone?

Progesterone is available to us in an oral pill form. Typically, one dose is given in the evening or right before bed. Progesterone is typically used on a rotating regimen, which alternates 10–12 days of progesterone use with 16–18 days without the drug. When exactly to take progesterone will be specified by your doctor.

Take progesterone at roughly the same time every evening to help you remember to take it. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any instructions on your prescription label that you are unsure about following. Progesterone should be taken as prescribed. Never take it in larger or less amounts or more frequently than directed by your doctor.

Side effects

Common side effects observed while medicating with progesterone are:

  • headache
  • muscle, joint, or bone pain
  • tiredness
  • problems urinating
  • mood swings
  • irritability
  • excessive worrying
  • sneezing
  • cough
  • vaginal discharge
  • runny nose
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • breast tenderness or pain
  • upset stomach

Inform the doctor if any of these conditions persist or get worse. There are also some severe side effects which must be informed to the doctor right away if observed such as:

  • seizures
  • stomach pain or swelling
  • severe dizziness or faintness
  • slow or difficult speech
  • weakness or numbness of an arm or leg
  • sharp chest pain
  • coughing up blood
  • leg swelling or pain
  • depression
  • hives
  • skin rash
  • itching
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • breast lumps
  • migraine headache
  • loss of vision or blurred vision
  • bulging eyes

Other negative effects of progesterone are possible. If you experience any strange issues while taking this medicine, contact your doctor right away.

Precautions before using Progesterone

There are certain medical conditions or interaction of drugs in a human body in which intake of Progesterone must be limited or avoided in order to prevent complications, such as:

  • If you have any of the following allergies: peanuts, oral contraceptives (birth control pills), hormone replacement treatment, progesterone, or any other drugs, let your doctor and pharmacist know right once.
  • Please let your doctor know if you are taking any herbal supplements, especially St. John’s wort.
  • Inform your physician if you experience or have previously experienced any of the following: unexplained vaginal bleeding between periods; a miscarriage where some tissue was left in the uterus; cancer of the breasts or of the female reproductive organs; seizures; migraine headaches; asthma; diabetes; depression; blood clots in the legs, lungs, eyes, brain, or anywhere else in the body; stroke or ministroke; vision issues; or liver, kidney, heart, or gallbladder.
  • Inform your doctor if you are expecting, intend to get pregnant, or are nursing a baby. Call your doctor if you become pregnant while taking progesterone.
  • Inform your doctor or dentist that you are taking progesterone if you are having surgery, including dental surgery.
  • Progesterone may cause you to feel lightheaded or sleepy. Prior to understanding how this drug affects you, avoid using machinery or driving a car. Take your regular dose of progesterone at bedtime if it does cause you to feel woozy or sleepy.
  • Progesterone may make you feel faint when you stand up too rapidly from a resting position, which is something you should be aware of. When you first begin taking progesterone, this is more typical. Get out of bed gradually, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up, to avoid this issue.

Progesterone need fo ovulatioin and menstruation

  • Lower progesterone before ovulation

Progesterone levels are low at the beginning of the menstrual cycle (during the period) and they stay low throughout the follicular phase.

  • Increased progesterone after ovulation

After ovulation, progesterone predominates among the hormones (the luteal phase). The area on the ovary where the follicle that housed the ovulated egg collapsed, known as the corpus luteum, produces progesterone. In the middle of the luteal phase, progesterone levels reach their highest. If conception is unsuccessful, the corpus luteum begins to degrade 9 to 10 days after ovulation, which lowers progesterone levels and signals the onset of the period.

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Is Idrofos good for Osteoporosis in postmenopausal women?

Is Idrofos good for Osteoporosis in postmenopausal women?

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis makes bones weak and brittle, so fragile that even minor stressors like coughing or bending over can break them. The hip, wrist, and spine are the most typical sites for osteoporosis-related fractures.

The living tissue that makes up bones is continually being destroyed and rebuilt. When the production of new bone is inadequate to replace the loss of existing bone, osteoporosis develops.

Symptoms of Osteoporosis

Early on in the process of bone loss, there are often no symptoms. However, after osteoporosis has compromised your bones, you may experience the following signs and symptoms:

  • vertebral fracture or collapse resulting in back pain
  • height decline with time
  • a hunched position
  • bone that fractures far more easily than anticipated

Causes of Osteoporosis

New bone is created and old bone is broken down as your bones are constantly being renewed. Your bone mass increases when you’re young because your body produces new bone more quickly than it destroys old bone. The majority of people reach their peak bone mass by age 30 after this process slows down in their early 20s. Bone mass decreases more quickly with ageing than it is gained.

Your bone mass from your youth has a bearing on how likely you are to acquire osteoporosis. Peak bone mass varies by ethnic group and is partially hereditary. Your likelihood of developing osteoporosis as you age decreases in direct proportion to your peak bone mass. It is a measure of how much bone you have in the body.

Idrofos

Ibandronate is a medical drug available to us under the generic name Idrofos which belongs to a class of medication called Bisphosphonates. This medicine is used to treat a condition (Osteoporosis) in women where the bone gets thinner and week which could break more easily. This medicine is generally used in women who have reached a change in life i.e. end of menstrual period called menopause

How to use?

Ibandronate is available to us in a form of pill that must be taken by mouth before morning breakfast or as per your doctor’s prescription. It is usually taken once a month daily. The dosage and length of the treatment is based on your medical condition, response to the treatment and other medicine that you may be taking for the same or different reason.

Swallow the tablet whole rather than chewing or crushing it in your mouth as it may release all the drug in your mouth which increases the risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you with a low dose which will increase gradually. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed as this may also increase the risk of side effects without any improvement in your condition. Discuss all the other medicines that you might be taking along with Ibandronate for the same or different reasons. Follow the medical prescription carefully and inform your doctor in case of any exception or confusion.

Side effects

Common side effects observed while medicating with Ibandronate are diarrhea, pain in arms/legs, mild flu symptoms or upset stomach may occur. Inform your doctor if these conditions persist or get worse.

There are some serious side effects which must be informed to the doctor right away if observed such as increased or severe bone/joint/muscle pain, new or unusual hip/thigh/groin pain, jaw pain, vision changes, etc. 

There are also some severe allergic reactions involved with these medications which require immediate medical attention if observed such as rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), trouble breathing, severe dizziness, new/severe/worsening heartburn, chest pain, difficult or painful swallowing, severe stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, etc.

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What is PCOS(Polycystic Ovary Syndrome)?

What is PCOS(Polycystic Ovary Syndrome)?

In women of reproductive age, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder. There may be infrequent or prolonged menstruation in women with PCOS, or an excess of male hormones (androgen). Numerous small collections of fluid (follicles) may develop in the ovaries and the eggs may not be regularly released.

With PCOS, women produce more male hormones than normal. Because of this hormone imbalance, they skip menstrual periods and are less likely to get pregnant.

PCOS is a “syndrome,” or group of symptoms that affects the ovaries and ovulation. Its three main features are:

  • cysts in the ovaries
  • high levels of male hormones
  • irregular or skipped periods

Affect of Hormone on PCOS.

Your reproductive hormones are out of balance if you have PCOS. You may not have your period on time or not get it if this occurs.

You make hormones to make different things happen in your body. Menstrual cycles are affected by some, as well as your ability to have a baby. Some hormones that play a role in PCOS are:

  • Androgens: Men often call them male hormones, but women also have them. They tend to be more abundant in women with PCOS.
  • Insulin: This hormone regulates your blood sugar levels. With PCOS, your body may not react correctly to insulin.
  • Progesterone: You may not have enough of this hormone, as a result of PCOS. A period might not come for a long time or you might not be able to predict when it will come.

Are there any symptoms of PCOS?

Missed, irregular, infrequent, or prolonged periods are the most common symptoms of PCOS. In addition to causing hair loss, excess androgens can cause acne and hair growth in places you don’t want it. There are several other side effects such as:

  • Mood changes
  • Pelvic pain
  • Darkened skin or excess skin (skin tags) on the neck or in the armpits
  • Weight gain around your middle

What Are the Causes of PCOS?

As per studies and report, a health professional do not know all the reason of PCOS occurence in a female body. The disorder is generally genetical i.e. passed on from mother or sister. It might also be caused by problems with insulin production which will affect the ability of the ovaries to ovulate. The exact cause of PCOSof however unknown to anyone. All the possible factors are stated above.

Can PCOS be linked with any complications?

When you have PCOS and your androgen levels are too high, you have a higher risk of complications. Among these complications are:

  • Pregnancy problem: In some cases, ovarian cysts can interfere with ovulation. An egg is released each month from one of your ovaries. You can’t become pregnant if a healthy egg is not available to be fertilized by a sperm. Having PCOS may not prevent you from getting pregnant. To make it happen, you may have to take medicine and work with a fertility specialist.
  • Metabolic Syndrome: The presence of these symptoms increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Symptoms include high triglycerides, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar.
  • Insulin disorder and diabetes: A high level of insulin resistance may cause your body to make too many androgens. A person who has insulin resistance has trouble absorbing blood sugar from their muscles, organs, and other tissues. Thus, your bloodstream can become too sugary. Your heart and nervous system can be affected by this disease, which is called diabetes.
Hormonal alterations in PCOS and its influence on bone metabolism in:  Journal of Endocrinology Volume 232 Issue 2 (2017)

There could be other Complications associated with PCOS that include:

  • High risk of Uterine cancer
  • Inflammation of liver
  • Depression
  • Sleep disorder
  • Anxiety, etc.

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