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Causes and treatment for irritating Eye twitching.

Causes and treatment for irritating Eye twitching.

Myokymia, or twitching of the eyelids, can be brought on by dry eyes, eye irritation, eye strain, lack of sleep, or an excessive amount of caffeine. Eyelid spasms that are severe or persistent could be symptoms of various diseases.

Myokymia, often known as an eyelid twitch, is a recurrent, uncontrollable spasm of the eyelid muscles. Although it can happen in either the upper or lower lids, a twitch typically happens in the upper lid.

These spasms are typically minor and feel like a slight tugging on the eyelid. Some people may have a spasm that is severe enough to make both eyelids totally close. These spasms normally last for a minute or two and happen every few seconds.

Eyelid twitching episodes might happen at any time. It’s possible for the twitch to come and go for several days. After that, you might not twitch for several weeks or even months.

Although the twitches are usually mild and unharmful, you could find them annoying. Most spasms will go away on their own, rarely requiring medical intervention.

When they are accompanied by additional face twitches or uncontrollable movements, eyelid spasms can occasionally be a sign of a persistent movement problem.

Types of eyelid twitches

Three types of eyelid twitching can be distinguished:

  • General eyelid spasm
  • essential blepharospasm
  • hemifacial spasm

General eyelid spasm

Eyelid spasms occasionally are deemed normal and don’t always signify a major issue. These twitches can be caused by a number of environmental causes and typically go away when you rest. You might want to discuss your symptoms with your doctor if these twitches persist and interfere with your daily activities.

Benign essential blepharospasm

You can have benign essential blepharospasm, which is the terminology for persistent and involuntary winking or blinking, if the spasms become chronic (long-term).

Usually affecting both eyes, this illness is more prevalent in women than in men. Up to 50,000 Americans may be affected by it, and it often appears in middle to late adulthood. Over time, the condition is likely to get worse and may lead to:

  • hazy vision
  • increased light sensitivity
  • facial twitches

Hemifacial spasm

When only one eye is affected by the eyelid twitch, a hemifacial spasm may be present. This particular spasm is a neuromuscular problem that is typically brought on by a blood vessel placing too much pressure on a facial nerve.

In addition to being more prevalent in Asian people, this illness affects women more frequently than it does men. Untreated, it could result in:

  • eye twitching that occurs often and without control
  • not being able to open your eye
  • your entire facial muscles on one side start to twitch.

What causes eyelid twitches?

There are many different reasons why eyelids could twitch. Talking to your doctor about this symptom could be helpful if it is causing you any trouble.

Eyelid twitching or spasms could be brought on by or aggravated by:

  • corneal abrasion, eye strain, or irritation
  • irritations caused by the environment, such as wind, bright lights, the sun, or air pollution
  • weariness or little sleep
  • physical effort or tension
  • usage of coffee, cigarettes, or alcohol
  • wet eyes
  • adverse effects of medicine
  • sensitivity to light
  • Uveitis, or swelling of your eye’s middle layer
  • Eyelid inflammation is known as blepharitis.
  • Pinkeye, or conjunctivitis
  • migraine attacks

Complications of eyelid twitches

Rarely are spasms of the eyelids a sign of a more severe brain or nerve problem. These more serious illnesses nearly typically come with other symptoms in addition to eyelid twitching.

The following brain and nerve conditions might produce eyelid twitches:

  • Bell’s palsy, also known as facial palsy, is a disorder that makes one side of your face droop downward.
  • Dytonia, which results in sporadic muscle spasms and twisting or contorting of the bodily part in question
  • Due to cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis), your neck may occasionally spasm and your head may occasionally twist in an uncomfortable manner.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS), a condition of the central nervous system that impairs movement and cognition and produces exhaustion and eye twitching
  • Parkinson’s disease, which can result in shaky limbs, rigid muscles, balance issues, and speech difficulties
  • Involuntary movements and verbal tics are hallmarks of the Tourette syndrome.

Eye Twitching Treatment

The majority of mild twitches vanish on their own. Getting enough sleep and limiting coffee, alcohol, and tobacco use may be beneficial. Try over-the-counter artificial tears if your eyes are dry or irritated.

Benign essential blepharospasm cannot be cured. However, your physician can provide symptom relief. Botulinum toxin is the most widely utilised therapy (Botox, Dysport, Xeomin). Hemifacial spasms are also treated by it.

To reduce the spasms, your doctor will inject little quantities into your eye muscles. The effect gradually fades away after a few months. You’ll require multiple treatments.

Your doctor might recommend drugs such as:

  • Clonazepam (Klonopin)
  • Lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Hydrochloride of trichexyphenidyl (Artane, Trihexane, Tritane)

These typically provide only transient comfort.

Alternative therapies consist of:

  • Biofeedback
  • Acupuncture
  • Hypnosis
  • Chiropractic
  • Nutritional treatment
  • coloured glasses

These therapies haven’t been shown to be effective in scientific trials. Your doctor might recommend surgery in some circumstances. Some of the muscles and nerves that surround your eyelid are removed during a treatment known as a myectomy.

A hemifacial spasm is brought on by pressure from an artery on your facial nerve, which can be relieved through surgery. The effects are long-lasting. However, there is always a potential of problems with surgery.

Eye Twitch prevention

Try keeping a notebook and documenting when your eyelid spasms occur if they are happening more regularly.

Take note of how much caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco you consume, as well as your level of stress and the amount of sleep you have been obtaining in the days before and during the eyelid twitching.

Try going to bed 30 minutes to an hour earlier if you notice that you experience more spasms when you don’t get enough sleep to help relieve the strain on your eyes and lessen your spasms.

REFERENCES:

  • https://www.healthline.com/health/eyelid-twitch
  • https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/eye-twitching/basics/causes/sym-20050838
  • https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/why-your-eyes-twitch
  • https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/symptoms/17663-eye-twitching

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Know the mainstream causes & symptoms of colour blindness.

Know the mainstream causes & symptoms of colour blindness.

What is color blindness?

When issues with the color-sensing pigments in the eye result in difficulty or a lack of capacity to discern colours, colour blindness is the result.

Most colorblind people are unable to tell the difference between red and green. Although this type of colour blindness is less prevalent, it might be difficult to distinguish between yellows and blues. Instead of the reds, greens, and teals that others see in colour charts, most colour blind people see the following hues:

  • yellow
  • grey
  • beige
  • blue

Mild to severe cases of the illness are possible. Achromatopsia, or total colorblindness, causes a person to only be able to see in grey or black and white. This syndrome is extremely uncommon, though.

Although there is a continuum (spectrum) of colours that we can all perceive, which ones we do so depends on how effectively our photoreceptors work. Your eyes have cells called photoreceptors that react to particular light wavelengths. Each person perceives colour slightly differently, and certain age-related eye diseases like cataracts may cause our perception of colour to vary over time.

Why do we see different colors?

Distinct light wavelengths are what we actually perceive as different colours when we view them. Your eyes have photoreceptors, which are cells that interpret light entering the eye to aid in colour perception. Rods can distinguish between light and darkness. When the lighting is bright enough, cone cells may distinguish colours. A different colour of light in the visible spectrum is associated with each wavelength. The longest wavelengths are red, the middle ones are green, and the shortest ones are blue.

How common is color blindness?

In men, colour blindness is more prevalent. Men are more likely to inherit colour blindness, while women are more likely to possess the faulty chromosome that causes it.

Approximately 8% of white males and 0.5 % of all girls are born with colour vision deficiencies, according to the American Optometric Association.

According to a 2014 study on colour blindness in Southern California preschoolers, non-Hispanic white children are more likely to have the condition than Black children, who are less likely to have it. In the entire world, 1 in 30,000 persons have achromatopsia. Up to 10% of them are completely colour blind.

Types of color blindness

Different colour vision issues are brought on by various types of colour blindness.

Colour blindness to red and green

Red and green can be difficult to distinguish from one another due to the most prevalent type of colour blindness.

Red-green colour blindness comes in 4 different forms:

  • Deuteranomaly. The most typical kind of red-green colour blindness is this one. It intensifies the red in green. This kind is modest and typically doesn’t interfere with daily activities.
  • Protanomaly. Red appears less brilliant and more greenish as a result. This kind is modest and typically doesn’t interfere with daily activities.
  • Deuteranopia and Protanopia. They both render it impossible for you to distinguish between red and green at all.

Blue-yellow color blindness

It is challenging to distinguish between blue and green as well as between yellow and red when one has this less prevalent type of colour blindness.

Blue-yellow colour blindness comes in two varieties:

  • It is challenging to distinguish between yellow and red and blue and green due to tritanomaly.
  • You can’t distinguish between blue and green, purple and red, or yellow and pink if you have tritanopia. Colors also appear less vivid as a result.

Blindness to all colours

You cannot see any colours if you are completely colour blind. This is exceedingly rare and is also known as monochromacy. You might also have problems seeing clearly and be more sensitive to light, depending on the type.

What causes color blindness?

The retina, a light-sensitive layer of tissue in the back of the eye, is made up of cone-like nerve cells that help you see colours.

Different wavelengths of light are absorbed by three different types of cones, and each kind responds to either red, green, or blue light. To help the brain distinguish between hues, the cones transmit information.

Color perception will be compromised if one or more of these cones in your retina are damaged or absent.

Heredity

Most cases of colour vision impairment are inherited. Usually, a woman passes it on to her son. Blindness or other vision loss is not brought on by inherited colour blindness.

Diseases

A illness or injury to your retina can also cause colour blindness.

Glaucoma is characterised by an excessively high intraocular pressure, which is the pressure inside the eye. The optic nerve, which transmits messages from the eye to the brain so you can see, is damaged by the pressure. Your capacity to discriminate between hues could therefore deteriorate.

Since the late 19th century, it has been known that persons with glaucoma cannot discriminate between blue and yellow, according to the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

The cones are found in the retina, which is harmed by macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. It may lead to colour blindness. It can sometimes result in blindness. The lens of your eye gradually transforms from translucent to opaque if you have a cataract. This could cause a fading of your colour vision.

Various other conditions that might impair vision include:

Medications

Changes in colour vision may result from taking certain drugs. These include thioridazine and chlorpromazine, two antipsychotic drugs.

Ethambutol (Myambutol), an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis, can affect the optic nerve and make it difficult to perceive particular colours.

Other elements

Other causes may also contribute to colour blindness. Age is one of the factors. Age-related progressive vision loss and colour deficiencies are possible. Additionally, the loss of colour vision has been connected to harmful compounds like styrene, which can be found in some plastics.

Symptoms of color blindness

A change in your eyesight is the sign of colour blindness that occurs the most frequently. For instance, it could be challenging to tell a traffic light’s red from green. Colors can appear less vivid than previously. A color’s various hues could all appear to be the same.

Color blindness frequently becomes obvious in young toddlers as they begin to learn their colours. Some people’s issue is not noticed since they have developed an association between certain hues and particular objects.

For instance, they refer to the colour they perceive as green since they are aware that grass is green. A person might not be aware that they aren’t seeing specific colours if their symptoms are quite minor.

If you think you or your kid may be colorblind, you should talk to your doctor. They can confirm the diagnosis and rule out any other, more severe health problems.

Who’s at risk for color blindness?

The majority of colorblind people have the condition from birth. They have inherited it from their relatives. However, certain drugs, ocular diseases, and even injuries can cause colour blindness.

You could be more susceptible to colour blindness if you:

  • are men.
  • being white.
  • possess relatives that are also colorblind.
  • Take vision-altering drugs.
  • have eye conditions such cataracts, glaucoma, or age-related macular degeneration.
  • Experiencing diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or Alzheimer’s disease (MS).

How is color blindness diagnosed?

Color perception is individual. It is impossible to tell if you perceive reds, greens, and other hues in a similar manner to those who have excellent vision. Nevertheless, during a routine eye checkup, your eye doctor can check for the problem.

Pseudoisochromatic plates, a unique type of picture, will be used in testing. These pictures are composed of coloured dots with embedded numbers or symbols. These numerals and symbols can only be seen by those with normal vision.

You might not see the number or might see a different number if you have colorblindness. As a large portion of early childhood instructional materials focus on the identification of colours, it is crucial that kids are evaluated before they begin school.

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How dangerous is Retinoblastoma for babies and toddlers?

How dangerous is Retinoblastoma for babies and toddlers?

The retina is where Retinoblastoma, an eye cancer, first appears (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye). Children younger than five are most frequently affected by it. Adults and older children can occasionally contract it as well.

Even though retinoblastoma is the most frequent cancer in children, it is still uncommon. Only 200 to 300 kids are diagnosed with retinoblastoma annually in the United States. It affects both males and girls equally, regardless of race or ethnicity. One or both eyes may develop retinoblastoma.

Early detection of this eye cancer is crucial because it is frequently treatable.

What is retinoblastoma?

The thin layer of light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of your eye is called the retina. It is in charge of absorbing light, converting it into neural impulses, and transmitting these signals as images to your brain.

Retinoblasts are cells that develop into the retina’s nerve cells throughout development. Retinoblastoma can develop if some of these cells proliferate uncontrollably. When the nerve cells (neurons) that form the retina have genetic alterations, retinoblastoma develops.

Retinal neurons divide and grow very quickly in the early stages of a child’s development until they eventually halt. These genetic abnormalities cause retinal neurons to proliferate and divide uncontrollably in children, leading to the development of tumours.

Young children are most at risk for having retinoblastoma because their neurons develop so quickly. In actuality, retinoblastoma typically affects children under the age of 6 and is diagnosed at an average age of 2 in those who do.

How does retinoblastoma develop?

Long before birth, the development of the eyes begins. Retinoblasts are cells that exist in the early stages of eye development and replicate to produce new retinal cells. These cells eventually cease proliferating and develop into mature retinal cells.

It happens very infrequently for this process to go awry. Some retinoblasts don’t mature; instead, they grow uncontrollably and develop into the malignancy retinoblastoma.

Retinoblastoma is caused by a complicated series of cellular events, but it virtually invariably begins with a change (mutation) in the RB1 gene. A mutation in the RB1 gene prevents it from functioning as it should, despite the fact that the normal RB1 gene aids in preventing uncontrolled cell growth. There are two main forms of retinoblastomas that can develop depending on where and when the RB1 gene is altered.

What causes retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma comes in two varieties: inheritable and sporadic. They stem from several causes. Let’s examine each in greater depth.

Inherited Retinoblastoma

Approximately one-third of all cases of retinoblastoma are inherited. In this type, not just a child’s retinal cells but every cell in their body has cancerous abnormalities.

The majority of the time, these mutations are acquired relatively early in a child’s development, but occasionally, they are passed down from one of the parents. The two eyes are most frequently affected by this kind of retinoblastoma (bilateral retinoblastoma).

There is a possibility that you will convey the retinoblastoma-causing gene to your offspring if you carry it. Because of this, it’s crucial to consult a genetic counsellor if you have ever received a diagnosis for this ailment and intend to become a parent.

Sporadic Retinoblastoma

A child will not have retinoblastoma mutations in every cell in their body in the remaining two-thirds of retinoblastoma cases. Instead, one retinal neuron in one of their eyes experiences a mutation that causes it to divide uncontrollably, which is when their cancer initially manifests.

You cannot pass sporadic retinoblastoma on to your offspring. It’s unclear what causes the genetic changes that lead to retinoblastoma in children, whether it’s inheritable or sporadic. It’s crucial to keep in mind that there are no recognised risk factors for this illness, thus there was nothing you could have done to stop the condition from afflicting your child.

A youngster must, however, undergo early screening if there is a family history of retinoblastoma.

Symptoms of Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma typically affects infants and young children, therefore its symptoms aren’t always immediately noticeable. You might spot some of the following symptoms in your child:

  • Instead of the traditional red reflex, leukocoria, a white reaction that develops as light enters the pupil, or a white mass behind one or both pupils that is frequently observed when a flash shot is taken
  • Eyes that strabismus, or gaze in various directions (crossed eyes)
  • redness and swollen eyes
  • Nystagmus, or uncontrollable, repetitive eye movements
  • bad vision

Other symptoms are possible, but they are often less prevalent. Make an appointment with your child’s paediatrician if you see any of these signs or any other changes in one or both of your child’s eyes that worry you.

How is retinoblastoma treated?

Each patient’s retinoblastoma treatment is unique. It relies on a number of variables, such as:

  • the tumor’s size
  • the tumor’s location
  • whether only one eye is impacted or both
  • stage of the tumour and whether it has migrated to tissues away from the eye (metastasis)
  • age and general well-being

Retinoblastoma treatments include:

  • chemotherapy
  • Cryotherapy, sometimes called cold therapy
  • laser treatment
  • radiation treatment
  • Enucleation, or the removal of the afflicted eye via surgery

To get the best outcomes, doctors occasionally combine various therapies.

Treatment for retinoblastoma that only affects one eye relies on whether the eye’s vision can be preserved. If the tumour affects both eyes, surgeons will attempt to preserve some vision by saving at least one eye.

The objectives of treatment for retinoblastoma are:

  • to preserve the kid’s life
  • eradicate cancer
  • to try and keep the eye
  • keeping as much of the vision as feasible

to reduce the chance of treatment adverse effects, particularly radiation therapy, as it could raise the likelihood that a kid would later get another form of cancer.

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Important types of Cataract everyone need to know about.

Important types of Cataract everyone need to know about.

What is Cataract?

A cataract is a hazy, thick region that develops in the eye’s lens. When proteins in the eye clump together, the lens is unable to transmit clear images to the retina. This leads to the development of a cataract. The retina functions by processing impulses from the light that enters via the lens. The optic nerve receives the signals from it and delivers them to the brain.

It gradually gets worse and eventually obstructs your eyesight. Cataracts can develop in both of your eyes, but they typically do not do so simultaneously. Older persons frequently develop cataracts. The National Eye Institute estimates that by the time people reach the age of 80, more than half of Americans either have cataracts or have had cataract surgery.

What Are the Symptoms?

Typically, cataracts form gradually. You might not even be aware of their presence until they begin to block light. Next, you might observe:

  • hazy, fuzzy, foggy, or filmy vision
  • Nearsightedness (in older persons)
  • alterations in how you see colour
  • driving issues at night (glare from oncoming headlights)
  • glare issues during the day
  • vision in the damaged eye is double.
  • Problems with spectacles or poorly functioning contact lenses

What Causes Cataracts?

The most frequent reason is ageing. This results from typical eye changes that start to occur after the age of 40. Normal lens proteins begin to degrade at that point. The lens becomes clouded due to this. Most people over 60 begin to experience some lens clouding. However, visual issues can not appear for a few of years. There are more causes of cataracts, such as:

  • having cataract-affected parents, siblings, or other family members
  • having certain health issues, such diabetes
  • smoking
  • having undergone radiation therapy for your upper body, surgery, or sustained an eye injury

Types of Cataract

When protein accumulates in the eye’s lens, clouding it, cataracts grow. This prevents crystal-clear light from going through. It may result in some vision loss for you. Cataracts can take many different forms.

Atomic cataracts

This type of cataract, also known as a nuclear sclerotic cataract, is the most common one observed by physicians. Most people who live long enough acquire one.

They develop in the nucleus, or core, of the lens. Your reading vision may actually improve as they get worse. Second sight is referred to as such, yet it is transient.

The lens hardens and turns yellow or even brown over time. Small details are difficult to perceive, colours become less vibrant, and in the dark. Also, brilliant objects appear to have haloes surrounding them.

Cortical cataracts

These develop on the cortex, the outside edge of your lens. They initially appear as white triangle-shaped wedges that point in the direction of your eye’s centre. They emit light as they expand.

Glare is the major symptom. Driving at night could be challenging for you. They may also cause you to feel as though there is a fog in front of your eyes. Identifying distinct colours or determining an object’s distance may be challenging.

You usually get them removed at a young age since they can cause problems with both close and far vision.

Cataracts in the posterior capsule

These develop right inside the rear of your lens capsule, the structure in your eye that encloses and stabilises the lens. Directly in the path of the light as it travels through the lens, they are.

You may experience symptoms within months because they develop more quickly than other cataracts. Your close-up vision is impacted, and they make it more challenging to see in strong light.

Prior to the capsule cataracts

This type develops right inside the lens capsule’s front portion. One may be brought on by an eye injury or edoema. Atopic dermatitis, a kind of eczema, can also cause this.

They might not require treatment if they are tiny or located outside the centre of the lens, it can prevent the eye from learning to see because a doctor must remove one that limits vision after a newborn is born.

Accidental cataracts

A cataract can develop as a result of numerous traumas. You may suffer from one if a ball strikes your eye, or if you suffer burn, chemical, or splinter injuries. The cataract may manifest right after following the damage or years later.

Additional cataracts

Doctors refer to a cataract as secondary if it develops as a result of another illness or medical procedure. Possible causes include diabetes, the use of steroid medications like prednisone, and even cataract surgery.

Ray-induced cataracts

UV radiation from the sun can harm your eyes in addition to your skin. This is something you may already be aware of. If you spend too much time in the sun without eye protection, you could occasionally get cataracts.

This type of cataract is more common in people who work outside, such as farmers and fishermen. Wear sunglasses that offer 100% UVA and UVB protection to avoid it. Another adverse effect of radiation therapy for cancer is cataracts.

Cataracts with zonules or lamellae

This variety often affects both eyes and younger children. They are transferred from parent to child via the genes that cause them.

These cataracts may develop into a Y shape and appear as little white dots in the lens’s centre. It is possible that the lens’ entire centre will eventually turn white.

Polar cataracts in the back

These develop on the rear of your lens in the middle. They’re frequently brought on by genes that have been passed down through your family.

It’s fortunate that posterior polar cataracts frequently don’t show any symptoms because they are challenging to remove.

Cataracts on the polar front

They appear as tiny white dots that develop in the front and centre of your lens. Usually, these cataracts don’t impair your eyesight.

Cataracts following a vitrectomy

The clear gel at the centre of your eye is called vitreous. It is removed during a procedure called a vitrectomy. The procedure may cause a cataract but can help with some eye conditions.

Cataracts in Christmas trees

They develop in your lens and are also known as polychromatic cataracts. People with myotonic dystrophy are more likely to experience them.

Cataracts with a rusty hue

A nuclear cataract becomes extremely hard and brown if untreated. It is known as brunescent.

You find it difficult to distinguish between hues, especially blues and purples. Surgery to remove it is more difficult, time-consuming, and dangerous than when you receive early therapy.

Cataracts caused by diabetes

You may develop this uncommon form of cataract if you have diabetes. It quickly worsens and develops a snowflake-like gray-white pattern.

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Important treatments you need to know about Conjunctivitis.

Important treatments you need to know about Conjunctivitis.

What is Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis, also referred to as “pink eye,” is an infection or swelling of your conjunctiva, a thin, transparent membrane that covers the white area of your eye and sits over the inner surface of your eyelid.

Your conjunctiva becomes inflamed with blood vessels when you have pink eye. This causes your eye to get red or pink, which is a characteristic of conjunctivitis.

Pink eye might be a pain, but it rarely impairs your eyesight. Pink eye irritation can be reduced with the use of treatments. Early detection and treatment of pink eye can assist in containing its spread because it can be contagious.

Types and causes

Pink eye generally falls into one of three categories:

Infectious pink eye comes in a few different kinds, including:

  • bacterial
  • viral

Bacterial Pink Eye: Staphylococcal or streptococcal germs cause bacterial pink eye. It usually happens as a result of activities like using dirty hands to touch your eyes, sharing makeup, or coming into direct contact with someone who might also have conjunctivitis.

Viruses that cause the common cold frequently induce viral pink eye. It could happen if someone nearby sneezes or coughs while suffering from an upper respiratory infection. When you have a cold virus yourself and blow your nose too hard, it might also happen. The infection may spread from your respiratory system to your eyes as a result.

An allergic eye condition

Seasonal allergies are the main cause of allergic pink eye. If they come into touch with an allergen, such as pollen, they may develop pink eye.

If you wear hard contact lenses or soft contact lenses that aren’t changed frequently enough, you could possibly have large papillary conjunctivitis, an allergic form of pink eye.

Conjunctivitis due to chemicals

Pink eye can be brought on by irritants like:

  • pools with chlorine
  • air toxicity
  • other chemical exposure

How contagious is pink eye?

Pink eye, both bacterial and viral, is extremely contagious. Pink eye can spread quickly from one person to another.

For instance, there is a possibility that you could contract pink eye if someone with viral pink eye touches their eye, then touches your hand, and you touch your eyes. Usually, a person with pink eye is contagious for as long as they are experiencing symptoms.

How is pink eye diagnosed?

The diagnosis of pink eye by a medical practitioner is often not challenging. Asking you a few questions and examining your eyes will generally be enough for them to determine if you have pink eye.

For instance, a medical expert would inquire about your eye itching and whether you have thick or runny discharge. Additionally, if you have hay fever, asthma, or cold-related symptoms, they might inquire about those as well.

They might also carry out the following tests:

  • an examination of your vision to determine whether it has been impacted
  • employing intense light and magnification, examine the conjunctiva and other exterior eye tissues.
  • making sure no additional tissues have been impacted by the inner eye examination

Pink eye treatment

Conjunctivitis treatment is based on the several underlying cause.

Conjunctivitis due to chemicals

If you have chemical pink eye, one technique to relieve symptoms is to rinse your eye with saline. In severe cases, topical steroids may also be recommended.

Infectious conjunctivitis

Antibiotics are typically used as a therapy for bacterial infections. Typically, adults like eye drops. Ointment might be a better option for kids because it’s simpler to apply.

Your symptoms will likely start to go away quickly after taking antibiotics, but it’s crucial to finish the entire course of treatment to reduce the likelihood of pink eye recurring.

Viral conjunctivitis

The viruses that frequently cause the common cold also cause viral conjunctivitis. The symptoms of these cold viruses are typically mild and go away on their own in 7 to 10 days, but there is presently no cure for them.

Rarely, other viruses that can lead to more severe infections, such as the varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus, may be at play. Antiviral medications are available for these viruses, however they are exclusively effective against these particular viral illnesses.

In the interim, relieving your symptoms with a warm compress or a cloth dampened with warm water will assist.

An allergic eye condition

Your doctor will likely recommend an antihistamine to treat pink eye brought on by an allergy in order to reduce irritation.

The antihistamines loratadine (Claritin) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) are sold without a prescription. Your allergy symptoms, such as allergic pink eye, might be relieved by them.

Antihistamine or anti-inflammatory eye drops are examples of additional treatments.

A home remedy

In addition to applying a warm compress, your neighbourhood pharmacy may sell eye drops that resemble your own tears. These might aid in easing the symptoms of pink eye.

Stop using contact lenses altogether until your pink eye is completely healed.

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What happens when a person is dignosed with Glaucoma?

What happens when a person is dignosed with Glaucoma?

What is Glaucoma?

A series of eye disorders known as glaucoma harm the optic nerve. For clear vision, the optic nerve, which transmits visual data from the eye to the brain, is essential. High pressure in your eye is frequently associated with damage to the optic nerve. However, glaucoma can develop with normal eye pressure as well.

Even while it can strike anyone, older persons are more likely to develop glaucoma. For those over 60, it is one of the main causes of blindness. Numerous glaucoma types show no symptoms at all. You might not notice a change in vision until the problem is advanced since the effect is so gradual.

Regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure are crucial. Early glaucoma diagnosis allows for possible prevention or slowing of vision loss. For the rest of your life, glaucoma patients will require treatment or monitoring.

Types of Glaucoma

(Chronic) Open-Angle Glaucoma

The only indication of open-angle, or chronic, glaucoma is a progressive loss of vision. Your vision could be permanently damaged due to this loss’s sluggish progression before any other symptoms show up. This is the most prevalent kind of glaucoma, according to the National Eye Institute (NEI).

(Acute) Angle-Closure Glaucoma

A strong, fast, and painful rise in pressure may result from the rapid buildup of fluid if the flow of your aqueous humour fluid is suddenly blocked. An emergency condition exists with angle-closure glaucoma. In the event that you start to experience symptoms like excruciating pain, nausea, or blurred vision, you should call your doctor right once.

Birth defects glaucoma

Congenital glaucoma is a condition in which an abnormality in the angle of the eye limits or delays normal fluid drainage. Symptoms of congenital glaucoma frequently include clouded eyes, excessive weeping, or sensitivity to light. Glaucoma that is congenital can run in families.

Secondary Glaucoma

Secondary glaucoma frequently develops as a result of trauma or another eye ailment, like cataracts or tumours. This kind of glaucoma can also be brought on by medications like corticosteroids. Rarely, glaucoma can develop as a result of eye surgery.

Glaucoma with normal tension

People with normal eye pressure occasionally get optic nerve injury. This has an unknown origin. However, this type of glaucoma may be caused by high sensitivity or a lack of blood supply to your optic nerve.

Symptoms of Glaucoma

Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most prevalent form of the disease. Except for a progressive loss of vision, it shows no indications or symptoms. You should therefore get yearly complete eye exams so that your ophthalmologist, or eye specialist, can keep track of any changes in your vision.

A medical emergency is acute-angle closure glaucoma, also known as narrow-angle glaucoma. If you suffer any of the following signs, see a doctor right away:

  • intense eye pain
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • your eye is red
  • abrupt changes in eyesight
  • observing bands of colour surrounding lights
  • sudden eyesight haze

What Causes Glaucoma?

Aqueous humour, a transparent fluid that is continuously produced in the back of your eye, The front of your eye is filled with this fluid as it is created. It then exits your eye via channels in your iris and cornea. The intraocular pressure (IOP), which is the normal pressure inside your eye, may rise if these pathways are completely or partially occluded. Your optic nerve may suffer injury if your IOP rises. You could start losing your eye’s sight if the damage to your nerve gets worse.

Sometimes it’s unclear why the pressure in your eyes rises. However, medical professionals think one or more of the following may be involved:

  • eyedrops for dilation
  • obstructed or constrained eye drainage
  • prescription drugs like corticosteroids

How Is Glaucoma Treated?

IOP reduction is the main objective of glaucoma treatment in order to prevent further vision loss. Usually, prescription eye drops are the first thing your doctor will prescribe. Your doctor might recommend one of the following therapies if these don’t work or if more sophisticated therapy is required:

Medications

There are many medications available that are made to lower IOP. These medications can be used orally or as eye drops, but drops are more prevalent. One of these or a mixture of them may be recommended by your doctor.

Surgery

Your doctor can advise surgery to create a drainage passage for fluid or remove tissues that are generating the excess fluid if a blocked or slow channel is the cause of elevated IOP.

Different therapies are used to treat angle-closure glaucoma. This form of glaucoma is a medical emergency that needs to be treated right away in order to lower eye pressure as soon as feasible. To reverse the angle closure, medications are typically used initially, but they may not be successful. It is also possible to use a laser to perform a procedure called laser peripheral iridotomy. To enable greater fluid circulation, this technique makes tiny holes in your iris.

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What are the benefits of doing Triphala eye wash?

What are the benefits of doing Triphala eye wash?

The most significant of the five senses and a fundamental component of the human body are the eyes. They require a lot of care because they are extremely fragile and sensitive. Good vision is ensured by healthy eyes, which are necessary for carrying out regular tasks.

The eyes are continually exposed to radiation from computers, desktops, mobile devices, television screens, and other electronic devices in today’s world. Additionally, eyestrain increases significantly as a result of dietary and lifestyle changes. Triphala is an Ayurvedic herbal remedy that can treat all of your eye issues.

Amla, Haritaki, and Bibitaki are three incredibly nourishing and renowned ayurvedic fruits that make up the triphala recipe. These powerful fruits contain an abundance of vitamins, minerals, and bioactive plant substances. This amazing mixture is full of nutrients that help to energise and fortify the body, including vitamins, minerals, salt carbohydrates, gallic acid, chebulinic acid, chebugali acid, and many others.

How To Use Triphala?

  • Mix one teaspoon of boiling water with the triphala powder. The chemicals in triphala are activated by the hot water.
  • Let the mixture completely cool.
  • Now filter the mixture using a fine fabric to remove any coarse powder particles that can irritate the eyes.
  • Put on eyepatch and pour triphala water into these glasses.
  • Blink a couple of times while placing your eyes in the eyecup. For at least a minute, repeat this.
  • After this treatment, just wipe the areas surrounding your eyes without rinsing them. The optimal time is immediately before going to bed since it allows the eyes to get plenty of rest and relaxation.

Benefits:

Triphala is an extremely powerful liver and kidney detoxifier, aids in digestion, and regulates blood sugar levels. Triphala functions as a Saptadhatu nourisher and has all six flavours recognised by Ayurveda. It is also a great component for eye health. Triphala eyewash is incredibly effective at treating eye conditions and preserving clear eyesight. Dry eyes, computer vision syndrome, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, conjunctivitis, and glaucoma can all be avoided with this treatment.

Degeneration of the macula

Macular degeneration is an eye condition where the retina deteriorates over time, eventually leading to visual loss. This eye problem can be prevented and improved with the use of triphala eyewash.

Elderly Cataract

Eyewash containing triphala is effective at treating and preventing senile cataracts. Age, smoking, and ongoing UV exposure all contribute to the development of this illness.

brings down oxidative stress

As a naturally abundant source of vitamin C, triphala possesses strong antioxidant qualities. It has the ability to stop harmful poisons from oxidising healthy cells and fight against free radicals in the body. Any oxidative stress-related ocular damage can be lessened with triphala eyewash.

Anti-aging Eye Conditions

One of the main components of Triphala, haritaki essence, has several health-improving qualities as well as anti-aging effects. Triphala eyewash is an ideal treatment for age-related visual issues due to these activities.

Boost Eye Muscle Strength

Triphala is well known for supporting clear vision and eye health and for enhancing eye muscle power. Triphala’s amla content is thought to enhance the Alochaka pitta, which controls vision. The ayurveda texts state that amla is a recognised sight rasayana.

Side effects

Despite being a safe option, triphala churna does include some hazards. Due to triphala’s downward energy flow, which might even result in miscarriages, pregnant women should avoid taking it. Triphala should not be taken by anybody, including nursing women, as it can harm the unborn child and pass through breast milk. Only give your infant a pinch of this powder at a time because more than that can cause diarrhoea and other digestive issues. Triphala churna should never be used in excess as it can dehydrate you and produce loose stools.

Consult your doctor before using triphala if you have diabetes. Due to triphala’s high fibre content, overusing it might cause bloating issues. Therefore, use low dosages if you already have gastric issues.

Usually, the first time you immerse your eyes in triphala water, there may be some moderate irritation. It is not cause for concern, but, as anything intolerable should be reported to the healthcare provider. You should be aware that the triphala formulation you are using is devoid of all chemicals and eye-harming preservatives. It is best to consult an ayurvedic practitioner before using the product because the eyes are the most delicate organ in the body.

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